Saturday, December 8, 2007

Perenity





















This morning I spent a few hours helping out Perenity. What's Perenity? Perenity is a flower ministry started in 2000 by Jennifer Slaughter of Birmingham, Alabama who's husband combined the words perennial and eternity to create the new name. Harriet Karo and Kristin Taylor took her model and have run with it in Nashville, Tennessee where they co-founded and now manage a successful local volunteer organization.

Perenity collects flowers after social functions, — weddings, parties, funerals, memorial services, etcetera — disassembles the arrangements and rearranges the flowers into new bouquets and vases then distributes those to hospices, nursing homes, hospitals and to anyone who might need some cheering up by a beautiful arrangement of flowers.

How does it work? Volunteers pick up donated flowers after social functions and bring them to "the barn" (a donated building).





















The used arrangements are taken apart and the flowers are freshly rearranged by more volunteers.





















Finally, the new arrangements are packed into cars and driven off for delivery.





















Everything is recycled or re-donated or composted. No money changes hands. What a fabulous organization! You can start a Perenity wherever you live. It's loads of fun and a win-win organization because it makes everyone feel wonderful all the way around. The florists who make the arrangements know that their efforts are not discarded after a one-time event. The volunteers enjoy working with the flowers and knowing how much their efforts will please the recipients who could not be happier to have a bunch of fresh flowers to gaze upon from their place of recovery or passing. The small Mom & Pop florists appreciate the donation of extra vases and arranging materials and the earth always enjoys good compost. A cradle to cradle affair if there ever was one!

1 comment:

LeenaM said...

And now I came here to your "home blog". You and your friends do an interesting work with plants!
It makes "good for the soul" do something quite different than the own work.
Have a relaxing Sunday!